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Vaccines & Health

Coronavirus vaccination

As new variants of Covid-19 continue to spread worldwide many countries continue to adjust restrictions and regulations which may impact your travel plans.

Visit our Coronavirus information page to learn more about travel vaccination regulations and how this may affect you.

Recommended vaccines and health advice by country

Vaccinations are highly recommended and often required when travelling to other countries. Here, we have included a recommended list of vaccines for the countries we offer services to:

The UK currently does not have a reciprocal healthcare agreement with Armenia. 

Medical facilities in Armenia are generally considered poor, particularly outside Yerevan, and treatment is not recommended for anything other than minor injuries or ailments. It is advised that you have adequate travel insurance alongside accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment while in Armenia. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Armenia: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Diphtheria 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Armenia please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/armenia/health. 

The UK currently does not have a reciprocal healthcare agreement with Azerbaijan. 

Medical facilities outside Baku are extremely limited, and it is recommended that you carry a first aid kit for any trips outside of Baku. It is worth noting that in the case of serious illness, you may be required to evacuate to Turkey or Western Europe therefore you will need to make sure your insurance covers this. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Azerbaijan: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Diphtheria 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Azerbaijan please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/azerbaijan/health. 

Medical facilities in Belarus are generally considered adequate for any illness or injury, although may vary outside of Minsk. 

An exclusion zone has been set up around the Chernobyl site which includes part of Southeast Belarus, this part of the country remains exposed to radioactive contamination and if travelling to this area it is recommended that travellers boil any water before drinking or to carry bottled water with you.  

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Belarus: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Tickborne Encephalitis 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Belarus, please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/belarus/health. 

The quality of medical facilities in China varies between regions, particularly outside major cities including Beijing and Shanghai, although is generally considered adequate for illness or injury. 

If you take prescription medication, ensure you take this with you as these may be difficult to obtain in China; many medicines are either unavailable or are prohibited.  

Healthcare is expensive in China therefore you will need to make sure you have comprehensive travel and medical insurance covering healthcare and medical repatriation for the duration of your stay. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 120 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to China: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Japanese Encephalitis 
  • Tetanus 
  • Typhoid 
  • Yellow Fever 
  • Dengue Fever 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in China please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china/health. 

Estonia is considered to have adequate medical facilities for injury or illness. 

UK nationals can obtain a free Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). This card entitles the holder to medical treatment that may become necessary during your trip and any treatment provided is on the same terms as Estonian nationals. 

If you don’t have your EHIC with you, you can call the NHS Overseas Healthcare Team on +44 191 218 1999 to get a Provisional Replacement Certificate. 

Although the EHIC covers you in case of injury or illness, it is not a replacement for adequate travel or medical insurance. It is recommended that you have both before travel as it does not cover all health-related costs, such as repatriation, ongoing, or non-urgent medical treatment. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Estonia: 

  • Hepatitis A 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Tickborne Encephalitis 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Estonia, please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/estonia/health. 

Medical facilities in Tbilisi are available for injury or illness but can be expensive. Medical facilities outside of Tbilisi vary greatly, therefore it is important to carry adequate travel insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of treatment and/or repatriation.  

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Georgia:  

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’)  
  • Hepatitis B  
  • Tetanus  
  • Diphtheria  
  • Rabies  

For more information about the health risks in Georgia please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/georgia/health.

While medical facilities in Tbilisi are available for injury or illness, they can vary outside of Almaty and Nur-Sultan, therefore it is essential for travellers to have adequate travel insurance to cover any treatment costs and/or repatriation. 

Certain prescription medications are not widely available in Kazakhstan; therefore, it is recommended that travellers take any required medication with them. Medications are often supplied under different brand names in Kazakhstan, so it is important to make a note of the generic name of the relevant drug if you do need to obtain this while in Kazakhstan. If your prescription medication is not available locally, it may be possible to get supplies couriered from abroad through certain private clinics. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Waiting times can be quite lengthy in Kazakhstan, therefore it is often best to get a taxi where possible. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines you need to have before travelling to Kazakhstan: 

  • Hepatitis A 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Tickborne Encephalitis 
  • Typhoid 
  • Yellow Fever 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Latvia, please visit https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/kazakhstan/health.

Latvia is considered to have adequate medical facilities for injury or illness.  

UK nationals can obtain a free Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC) or European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). This card entitles the holder to medical treatment that may become necessary during your trip and any treatment provided is on the same terms as Latvian nationals.  

If you don’t have your EHIC with you, you can call the NHS Overseas Healthcare Team on +44 191 218 1999 to get a Provisional Replacement Certificate.  

Although the EHIC covers you in case of injury or illness, it is not a replacement for adequate travel or medical insurance. It is recommended that you have both before travel as it does not cover all health-related costs, such as repatriation, ongoing, or non-urgent medical treatment.  

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 113 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Latvia: 

  • Hepatitis A 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Tickborne Encephalitis 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Latvia, please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/latvia/health. 

The standard of medical care in Moldova is below that available in the UK and English is not widely spoken, particularly outside of Chisinau. Therefore, it is essential that travellers carry adequate travel insurance for treatment and/or repatriation. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Moldova: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Diphtheria 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Moldova, please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/moldova/health.

The quality of medical facilities in Mongolia varies between regions, particularly outside of Ulaanbaatar, although is generally considered adequate for illness or injury. 

Treatment is often expensive and can be substantial in the case of repatriation, therefore you need to make sure you have an adequate level of travel insurance to cover this. Many Mongolian healthcare professionals require payment up front in cash, therefore you need to make sure you have accessible funds available. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Mongolia:  

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Typhoid 
  • Tickborne Encephalitis 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Mongolia, please visit https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/mongolia/health.

Medical facilities in Russia vary between regions, although are considered adequate for illness or injury in major cities such as Moscow and St Petersburg. 

The European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is not valid in Russia, and medical care in remote areas of Russia is below western standards. Hospitals do not accept all cases and often require cash or credit card payments at Western rates in advance of treatment. 

You can typically bring prescription and over the counter medication into Russia for personal use. There are exceptions for medications that include narcotic or psychoactive substances, and these will often require you to have a prescription slip in your name which has been translated into Russian and then notarised. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 112 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Russia:  

  • Hepatitis A  
  • Hepatitis B  
  • Tetanus  
  • Tickborne Encephalitis  
  • Rabies  

For more information about the health risks in Russia, please visit https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/russia/health.

State medical facilities in Ukraine are generally considered poor. Private clinics and hospitals offer a better standard of care, though these do not always meet western standards and practices. If you are involved in an accident or taken ill, it is likely that you will be taken to a state hospital unless you can show that you have comprehensive medical insurance cover. 

Medications are not widely available in Ukraine and vary between the major cities and towns, therefore, it is good to know the general name of any medications you are taking as this will likely vary in brand name. 

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, you can dial 103 and ask for an ambulance. Please remember to contact your medical/travel insurance company as soon as possible if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment. 

There are several vaccines recommended before travelling to Ukraine: 

  • Hepatitis A (only for those considered ‘high-risk’) 
  • Hepatitis B 
  • Tetanus 
  • Diphtheria 
  • Rabies 

For more information about the health risks in Ukraine, please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/ukraine/health.